Daryl Barth

Daryl Barth 

Daryl Barth has a knack for science, and she has worked on the YInMn project, a blue pigment discovered by an Oregon State University professor in 2009. As a member of Dallas Makerspace, a nonprofit in Carrollton, Barth took the lead in a local version of the project and discovered how to make the color. Barth said ideas and phenomenon that interest here are symbiotic relationships, community empowerment/positive thinking, fungi, bioluminescence and other amazing acts of nature. She plans to apply for PhD programs in bioengineering.

Tell us a little bit about yourself. 

I'm a twenty-four year old actor/mime turned scientist. Born and raised in Dallas, I attended the Booker T. Washington High School for the performing and visual arts, then ended up at the University of California, Berkeley where I graduated with a B.S. in materials science and engineering. Post-graduation, I spent six months in France studying and then in Portugal working in a tissue engineering lab there.

How did you get involved with Dallas Makerspace? 

I had an idea for a present that required the use of a laser cutter, so I searched online for a maker/hackerspace near me and the Dallas Makerspace popped up! I went on the public tour they have every Thursday and fell in love with the place and awesome community they have there. On the tour, met some of the people on the science committee who invited me to their weekly meetings on Sunday, and I was hooked!

What do you enjoy about working with Dallas Makerspace? 

The space and community are very empowering. It's a place where you can share crazy ideas you have and be supported and also help other people realize their own awesome projects. You can take classes and teach on topics you are interested in, and everyone is encouraging you to learn!  The Dallas Makerspace is also about to double in size, so there will be even more machinery and community.

What kind of work do you do there? 

Mostly, I have been involved with the science committee – most recently, we started a collaboration between science and creative arts surrounding the YInMn blue pigment. Several other projects that are underway in science are tissue culture with orchids, making superconducting pucks and distilling essential oils. As new people join the space and members have ideas, we are always adding and shifting what we are working on, so it is very dynamic and exciting! 

What inspired you to work with science? 

I had two inspiring teachers in high school: Mr. Asher who taught chemistry and Mr. Betzen who taught physics. They showed me how science gives you a framework to explore and make sense of how and why the world is as we observe it to be. They along with many others I have been fortunate enough to meet and interact with have encouraged and inspired me to study and work with science.

Tell us a little bit about the YInMn blue project you worked on? 

YInMn blue is a blue pigment discovered by Professor Mas Subramanian of Oregon State University in 2009. His lab was looking for novel materials that could be used in electronics applications by combining different oxides. In this case, they mixed Yttrium oxide (a white powder), Indium oxide (a yellow powder), and Manganese oxide (a dark brown powder) together, popped it into a furnace, and when they pulled it out, the gray mixture had turned a brilliant blue! This is the first blue pigment discovered in the last 200 years and it has some interesting properties such as some infrared reflection which makes it potentially useful for heat shielding and it doesn't include toxic elements such as Cobalt and Cadmium which have been traditionally used in blue pigments. One of the members of science discovered this research and wanted to experiment with the pigment and since I have a background in materials science, I was appointed as the lead. We figured out how to make the pigment from reading up on Professor Subramanian's research, ordered the oxides and then had a party with creative arts to reveal the pigment we made and discuss how we can use it to make cool art!

What do you hope to accomplish with your skill/talent? 

Ultimately, I am interested in bringing about (and helping to bring about) sustainable, bioinspired and preferably nature-derived materials that can be used in lieu of the plastics that make up most of our non-biodegradable waste.

What's your favorite way to pass the time? 

Doing some form of movement in an inspiring, beautiful setting while getting to know and learning from some lovely people.

What's your favorite movie?

I don't really have a favorite, but a movie I can always watch is “Love Actually.” It's a heartwarmer.

If you could have any superpower for the day, what would it be? 

Hive mind-melding or teleportation

 

Daryl Barth has a knack for science, and she has worked on the YInMn project, a blue pigment discovered by an Oregon State University professor in 2009. As a member of Dallas Makerspace, a nonprofit in Carrollton, Barth took the lead in a local version of the project and discovered how to make the color. Barth said ideas and phenomenon that interest has her interest are symbiotic relationships, community empowerment/positive thinking, fungi, bioluminescence and other amazing acts of nature. She plans to apply for PhD programs in bioengineering.

 

Tell me a little bit about yourself. 

I'm a twenty-four year old actor/mime turned scientist. Born and raised in Dallas, TX, I attended the Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts, then ended up at the University of California, Berkeley where I graduated with a B.S. in Materials Science and Engineering. Post-graduation, I spent six months in France studying and then in Portugal working in a tissue engineering lab there.

How did you get involved with Dallas Makerspace? 

I had an idea for a present that required the use of a laser cutter, so I searched online for a maker/hackerspace near me and the Dallas Makerspace popped up! I went on the public tour they have every Thursday and fell in love with the place and awesome community they have there. On the tour, I saw a flow hood and met some of the people on the Science Committee who invited me to their weekly meetings on Sunday, and I was hooked!

  1. What do you enjoy about working with Dallas Makerspace? 

The space and community are very empowering. It's a place where you can share crazy ideas you have and be supported and also help other people realize their own awesome projects. You can take classes and teach on topics you are interested in, and everyone is encouraging you to learn!  The Dallas Makerspace is also about to double in size, so there will be even more machinery and community.

  1. What kind of work do you do there? 

Mostly, I have been involved with the Science Committee – most recently, we started a collaboration between science and creative arts surrounding the YInMn blue pigment. Several other projects that are underway in science are tissue culture with orchids, making superconducting pucks and distilling essential oils. As new people join the space, and members have ideas we are always adding and shifting what we are working on, so it is very dynamic and exciting! 

  1. What inspired you to work with science? 

I had two inspiring teachers in high school: Mr. Asher who taught chemistry and Mr. Betzen who taught physics, they showed me how science gives you a framework to explore and make sense of how and why the world is as we observe it to be. They along with many others I have been fortunate enough to meet and interact with have encouraged and inspired me to study and work with science.

Tell us a little bit about the YInMn blue project you worked on? 

YInMn blue is a blue pigment discovered by Professor Mas Subramanian of Oregon State University in 2009. His lab was looking for novel materials that could be used in electronics applications by combining different oxides. In this case, they mixed Yttrium oxide (a white powder), Indium oxide (a yellow powder), and Manganese oxide (a dark brown powder) together, popped it into a furnace, and when they pulled it out, the gray mixture had turned a brilliant blue! This is the first blue pigment discovered in the last 200 years and it has some interesting properties such as some infrared reflection which makes it potentially useful for heat shielding and it doesn't include toxic elements such as Cobalt and Cadmium which have been traditionally used in blue pigments. One of the members of science discovered this research and wanted to experiment with the pigment and since I have a background in materials science, I was appointed as the lead. We figured out how to make the pigment from reading up on Professor Subramanian's research, ordered the oxides, and then had a party with creative arts to reveal the pigment we made and discuss how we can use it to make cool art!

  1. What do you hope to accomplish with your skill/talent? 

Ultimately, I am interested in bringing about (and helping to bring about) sustainable, bioinspired and preferably nature-derived materials that can be used in lieu of the plastics that make up most of our non-biodegradable waste.

  1. What's your favorite way to pass the time? 

Doing some form of movement in an inspiring, beautiful setting while getting to know and learning from some lovely people.

  1. What's your favorite movie?

Hmmm, I don't really have a favorite, but a movie I can always watch is “Love Actually.” It's a heartwarmer.

  1. If you could have any superpower for the day, what would it be? 

Hive mind-melding or teleportation

 

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