Plano Future

Plano Future members protest the Plano Tomorrow plan during a November 2015 city council meeting

A decision made in a Dallas appellate court yesterday progressed a five-year lawsuit between a resident-based group and the city of Plano. A decision made in a Dallas appellate court yesterday progressed a five-year lawsuit between a resident-based group and the city of Plano.

Plano Future, an organization formed after the city released its comprehensive plan, Plano Tomorrow, filed suit to require the city to present a citizen petition to the City Council. Justice David Schenck at Dallas’ 5th Court of Appeals reversed a previous decision that sided with the city.

Plano Future, an organization formed after the city released its comprehensive plan, Plano Tomorrow, filed suit to require the city to present a citizen petition to the City Council. Justice David Schenck at Dallas’ 5th Court of Appeals reversed a previous decision that sided with the city.

Plano Future is comprised of residents Elizabeth Carruth, Matthew Tietz, Janis Nasseri, Judith Kendler and Stephen Palma.

Plano’s comprehensive plan, which is the object of opposition for the citizens’ group, is an outline of what the city plans to do with the city’s small portion of undeveloped land within the next couple of decades.

According to the new decision, Lisa Henderson, the city’s secretary, is required to present a citizen petition to council within 14 days. City Attorney Paige Mims said council members are waiting to express their thoughts until they meet next week.

Paige Mims

Paige Mims

“No steps will be taken prior to a discussion with City Council,” Mims said. “They plan on discussing the matter in executive session Monday night.”

The lawsuit between the city and Plano Future began after the residents voiced concerns for the city’s comprehensive plan. While the city has maintained the plan is a draft and has the ability to change, Plano Future believes the document includes too many apartment units. The group worries more housing density will decrease the city’s suburban qualities.

In a 2015 letter to the planning and zoning commission, the group wrote, “The number of new apartments, their location and the overall population growth should be very modest so as to continue our suburban form.”

Some of the main critiques for Plano Tomorrow are its focus on urban development and high-density, multifamily homes with “work, live, play” combinations. Those behind the Plano Future group want to enable a citizens’ vote on the plan.

The city has argued that plans related to zoning are not able to be voted upon by the public. Check PlanoStar.com for updates on next week’s council meeting.

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